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12:00 CET

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12:30
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12:45
English Talk Beginner
Mitte
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With co -founders Isabel Drost - Fromm and Stefan Rudnitzki and the organizer team

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12:45
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13:30
Talk Beginner
Mitte
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In her keynote Julia will talk about public funding of open source technologies and why we need a European open technology fund.

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13:00 CET

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13:40
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14:10
Talk Beginner
Mitte
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A few years ago, Heartbleed epitomized a massive open source sustainability problem for critical parts of the internet infrastructure. The bug, which affected the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library, notably compromised the confidentiality of 4.5 million US patient records and cost the industry an estimated $500M.

It was soon revealed that the root-cause of the issue was that OpenSSL was precariously understaffed. Open source sustainability became a major theme overnight. Stories of maintainer burn-out made the headlines. And tentative solutions started to emerge, most of them donation-based.

In this talk we’ll explore a number of existing strategies to fund open source and make it more sustainable, from patronage to dedicated ad networks. And we’ll defend the idea that the best path to open source sustainability is to help companies understand the tangible business value they can get from contributing to open source.

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13:40
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14:10
Open Source Program Office

The Evolution of OSPOs

Danese Cooper
Talk Beginner
Prenzlauer Berg
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The concept of Open Source Program Offices or OSPOs is a familiar one within the corporate open source world. A growing number of governments, cities and universities have now also identified the benefits of OSPOs. However, public sector OSPOs tend to have a different set of priorities to Corporate OSPOs. While at Sun Microsystems, Danese Cooper set up one of the first OSPOs, just a few months after the term Open Source was coined. In this session, Danese will give an update on OSPO trends, explore how public sector OSPOs can differ from corporate OSPOs, and share how OSPOs can enable global collaboration to scale impact, and achieve public policy goals.

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14:00 CET

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14:20
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14:50
Talk Beginner
Mitte
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Since mid 2019 Digital Sovereignty has been promoted by the Government in Germany, for the most of us unexpectedly. 

Behind the scenes economical motivations are driving the initiatives. Several new governmental agencies have been created, projects have been started on scale driving the administration to go digital, finally deliver a promise broken for at least twenty years.

The fear of loosing the industrial technology base to the US and Chinese cloud hyperscalers, conflicts with the US administration on political questions have created lots of activities.

Gaia-X and the Corona app are only the most prominent initiatives started directly by the German government. 

The talk tries to give an overview what is going on, tries to give an estimation what will come next, how sustainable the initiatives are, where it makes sense to demand further steps.

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14:20
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14:50
Talk Intermediate
Prenzlauer Berg
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Open source projects that are controlled by a single company are at a greater risk of changes that are not aligned with community interests, whereas projects that are under neutral foundations have a lower risk both for end users and software vendors. With advantages that include community building, innovation, and wider adoption, we should consider contributing more of our open source projects to neutral foundations.

This talk will cover:

  • Challenges of giving up control and why it might be worth it.
  • Selecting a foundation and how to determine neutrality.
  • Creating a fair and neutral governance structure and processes for your project.
  • Tips for contributing and maintaining your project.

The audience will get practical advice about whether they should contribute their projects to neutral foundations along with how and when to do it.

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15:00 CET

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15:00
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15:30
Talk Beginner
Mitte
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We all wish for the up and coming young generation to get thoroughly and completely immersed in the world of FOSS. They should eat, drink and breath it to become good and loyal members of the community.

But... many of them do not even know that FOSS exists. Their eyes never leave the smartphone screens and they dream of Microsoft Windows, Adobe Photoshop, Apple iPhone and Xbox. So how do we enlighten them? How to we let the everloving glow of FOSS reach in to their dark and dreary lives?

As a teacher in Web development for students who aim to become engineers ("Gymnasieingenjör i Mjukvaruutveckling"), I teach them how modern software development is steeped in FOSS philosophy and try to show them all the posibilitys that rise from the community.  This is a short insight in how FOSS can (and should) be a big part of secondary education in Sweden.

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15:00
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15:30
Talk Intermediate
Prenzlauer Berg
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Public Money, Public Code… but what are the best practices for public sector bodies to release new projects or share their own projects as FOSS? Why is it not "easy-peasy" (it certainly should be a "no-brainer")? Public sector bodies usually don’t have the staff with FOSS skills (certainly at management level, although they increasingly have developers who do, and are keen to embrace FOSS), they don’t have the time, and it is not a priority… even if there is a legal mandate. Two veteran open source lawyers present their experience in working with two public sector projects in the UK and Spain respectively, for publicly sharing code, with two totally different approaches looking for short term wins and long term sustainability. Governance? Contributions? Community Principles? High level inter-administration agreements? IP Management? Resources and funding? Navigating internal management?

You name, we have … no answers but maybe some hints that will help you work with local governments for freeing up public code. 

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16:00 CET

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16:00
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16:30
Talk Beginner
Mitte
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Adapting to the "new normal" of defaulting to working from home, while simultaneously providing care - or schooling - for children, elders and other family members, all whilst attempting to maintain our own career success and preserve our mental health in the face of enormous stressors has been -- well, let's be honest, it has been sucktastic. 

In this presentation, I will do some real talk about love during Coronazeit: love for our families, love for ourselves, and how to best show empathy to our colleagues who are somehow making it work under near-impossible circumstances. I will also discuss the disproportionate struggles of professional women during the pandemic, and how the increased demand for 'emotional labor' in these times has led to increased burnout, flight of women from the workforce, and limitations to women's future career growth opportunities. 

Audience members will leave with a greater understanding of small ways they can each provide better care to themselves and their communities. We are all in this together and can only prosper when we are committed to mutual support.

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16:00
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16:30
Talk Intermediate
Prenzlauer Berg
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Presentation describing the open source practices and initiatives being put in place at European Commission including the implementation of the new Open Source Strategy (announced in October 2020).

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16:40
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17:10
English Talk Beginner
Mitte
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An important prerequisite for open source projects, software or community is proper documentation which includes a contributing guideline to encourage contributors to participate. Most times, beginners struggle with these contributing guidelines mainly because they are too technical to comprehend. This has become an obstacle for most beginners who are looking into contributing to Open Source.

This session will be  focused on;

  • Problems With most contribution guidelines

  • My experience as a beginner

  • The need for inclusiveness in contribution guidelines

  • Impact of detailed contribution guidelines to a project.

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16:40
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17:50
Panel Discussion
Prenzlauer Berg
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An Open Source community's culture eats governance for breakfast. As we look to further build institutions in the Open Source movement through OSPOs, how is the cultures of Open Source collaboration maintained? How do we create new Open Source institutions where the unique cultures of government, industry, and academia can converge on sustainable Open Source collaborations? Join us for a panel of experts to explore their experiences and insights on open source culture between institutions. 

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17:00 CET

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17:20
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17:50
Lightning Talk Intermediate
Mitte
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As a professor, I want to create open source startups with my doctoral (Ph.D.) students. To that end, I have set up courses and a whole program. Frankly, there is no better place than Germany to get started, as public funding can carry you through the research well into Series A territory. In this talk, I'll explain how I try to give my students their Ph.D. and help them turn their research work into a startup.

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17:20
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17:50
Lightning Talk Beginner
Mitte
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Our goal is to help people developing public-purpose software understand how the Standard for Public Code can help them collaborate. The Standard is of course applicable to everyone developing open source software, and is especially useful if you want other organizations to be able to contribute to your code.

By applying the Standard, code created for and by governments will not only be reusable and open source on paper, but also in practice. We hope to show that it is not that hard to create genuinely reusable code, and inspire collaboration across public organizations.

The talk will also answer the following questions:

  • What is public code?
  • Why the need for a Standard for Public Code?

The talk will show how the Foundation for Public Code is already applying the Standard to some codebases, and how this has helped those communities.

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17:20
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17:50
Lightning Talk Beginner
Mitte
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Governance is important, but unless you start out with a really clear vision, it might be hard to get everyone on the same page. People join projects at various times and when the project is small, governance is often not a top priority. Governance usually becomes a priority ex-post, or when a project is already in full implementation. So how do you get agreement and a common understanding on the governance of your codebase? If it wasn't already clear, chances are that people will have different views on what the status quo is. And if discussions are started based on different premises, misunderstandings are bound to happen. That is why we created the Governance Game. The Governance Game (https://github.com/publiccodenet/governance-game) is a fun way to explore how organisations can maintain shared and collaborative open content together. It can help you and your community to start talking about various aspects of governance, and highlight potential pitfalls. In this session we'll show you a few different ways of how you can use this game to enhance your project.

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