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9:00

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09:30
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09:40
Talk
Kesselhaus
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Join us for the opening ceremony of FOSS Backstage and the Apache Roadshow.

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09:40
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10:20
Keynote Beginner
Kesselhaus
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As the 20th anniversary of Open Source Initiative is coming up this year, Danese is working on book on the subject of stories from the early days of Open Source that were never written down. She will share some of them in her upcoming keynote for FOSS Backstage!

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10:00

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Diversity & inclusion is very important especially for free & open source community, because:

- People in tech nowadays are hired to a big part because of their open source contributions. To improve the balance there, the free & open source software community is an important starting point.
- More diverse teams make for more innovation and serving users better than homogenous teams.
- Diverse open source projects are more welcoming and friendly towards new contributors, encouraging learning and collaboration.

We are building http://opensourcediversity.org to collect the projects and resources in this field. It is aimed at maintainers and contributors of open source projects who want to improve, as well as people from underrepresented groups who are interested in free & open source software but don’t know where to start.

This talk is a showcase of the different initiatives for diversity & inclusion existing in open source, and a start for discussion where we can improve more.

╱╲
10:30
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10:50
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
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In a world strongly demanding self-organization and participation, there is an urgent need for mentoring ways that didn't originate in traditional HR or top-down approaches. Peer coaching methods will become the foundation of independent and self-paced advancement and will also facilitate networking within companies and even beyond.

I will introduce two techniques that are available for everyone, quickly realizable, and yet location- and equipment-independently usable - the Presencing Institute's "Case Clinic" and John Stepper's "Working Out Loud".

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10:30
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11:15
Apache Roadshow – Tomcat

State of the Cat

Mark Thomas
Talk
Moon Lounge
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A review of the last 12 months in the Apache Tomcat project covering notable security vulnerabilities, critical bugs and significant new features folloThu by a look-ahead to the next 12 months including plans for Tomcat 10, products reaching end-of-life and thoughts on the impact of the transfer of JavaEE to Eclipse. This session is intended for anyone working with, or considering working with, Apache Tomcat and will provide an opportunity to learn more about the future roadmap.

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10:30
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11:15
Talk
Palais Atelier
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Apache CloudStack is open source software designed to deploy and manage large networks of virtual machines, as a highly available, highly scalable Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud computing platform. This talk will give an introduction to the technology, its history and its architecture. It will look common use-cases (and some real production deployments) that are  seen across both public and private cloud infrastructures and where CloudStack can be completed by other open source technologies. The talks will also compare and contrast Apache Cloudstack with other IaaS platforms and why he thinks that the technology, combined with the Apache governance model will see CloudStack become the de-facto open source cloud platform. He will run a live demo of the software and talk about ways that people can get involved in the Apache CloudStack project.

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11:00

╲╱
11:00
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11:40
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
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When considering how to design products, teams, or even common every day household objects, empathy doesn't end up on the required features list. Yet, without empathy, teams with enormous technical skills can fail in their quest to deliver quality products to their users. Incredible projects fail to create communities because they don't exercise it. Fail at empathy, and your chances of failing at everything skyrockets.

Contrary to what you may have heard, empathy is not something you're innately born with - it's a skill that can be learned, cultivated, refined and taught to others. In this presentation, your lovely co-speakers will discuss the value of empathy, how you can cultivate it in yourself and your organizational culture, and conclude with concrete steps for leveling up in your interactions with your fellow human beings.

 

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11:00
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11:40
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
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Open Source Software has become the “de facto” standard in many industries, and with the popularization of collaboration platforms such as GitHub we have seen a big rise of newcomers and even enterprises getting involved and contributing their projects to Open Source. However, properly open sourcing a project requires you to have a good understanding of multiple areas such as software license, community building, public Ci infrastructure, etc. In this talk, we will go over a practical guide to take your project open source: we will explore how a software license influences what can be done with your project, we will dive into dependencies and license compatibilities, as well as share some best practices to help your project attract contributors and how to accept 3rd party contributions in a way that your projects can continue to perform open source releases as well as be incorporated into enterprise products and/or services. We will also touch a little on existing open source foundations and their process to accept new projects (e.g. Apache Incubator, Jupyter Incubator, Eclipse, etc)

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11:00
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11:40
English Workshop Intermediate
Palais Workshop
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Aging Open Source projects face a different set of problems from emerging ones. For example how do contributors remain motivated when much of the work to be done is maintenance, how can you attract new contributors to a project that seems to be done or how do you avoid the trap of "we've tried that ten years ago"? Some of the issues probably can and even should be tackled when the project is still striving.

In this workshop Stefan will show some of the issues the Apache Ant community faces and what has been tried to far as an introduction. He's keen on learning what other projects do or have tried in the past and how it worked out for them.

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11:25
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12:10
Talk
Moon Lounge
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The Java Enterprise world went through wild ups and downs lately. But where do we go from here? And what does the ASF have to do with all that? Let's find out!

This talk will give an overview of a bunch of 'Enterprise' projects at the ASF, what their current state is and when to use them.
We'll then shed a light on Apache Meecrowave for MicroServices and MicroProfile appliations and finally move over to Apache TomEE 8 for serving classic enterprise applications while still aiming for simplicity and performance.

This talk includes a basic setup and introduction to building apps with the platforms mentioned above.

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11:25
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12:10
Talk
Palais Atelier
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Apache CloudStack 4.11 recently shipped with 1000 updates including over 50 new and enhanced features.  This presentation will lift the covers on some of the exciting new features that users and cloud operators can enjoy in the 4.11

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11:50
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12:30
Talk Intermediate
Kesselhaus
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When creating a new system that works with an established project, an important consideration is whether to make a new project or a subproject of the established
project. The considerations include:

  • How fast is the release cycle for the established project?
  • How tight is the integration with the established project?
  • Will the excitement of a new project bring more visibility?
  • Is the community separate from the established project?
  • Is the new project large enough to be self-sustaining?
  • Will tighter integration with the established project be helpful or cause difficulty for integrating with external projects.

We'll cover some of the cases that we made this decision and how they turned out:

  • Hadoop and RecordIO
  • Hadoop and Avro
  • Hive and Tez
  • Hive and ORC

After making the decision, as the projects evolve the tradeoffs may change and
need to be revisited. Unfortunately we also have experience and have
pulled apart ORC from Hive and now the metastore from Hive. We'll cover the
technical challenges and the governance challenges of splitting an existing project
into two projects.

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11:50
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12:30
Talk Intermediate
Maschinenhaus
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If you develop or distribute software of any kind, you are vulnerable to whole categories of attacks upon yourself or your loved ones. This includes blackmail, extortion or "just" simple malware injection…  By targeting software developers such as yourself, malicious actors, including nefarious governments, can infect and attack thousands — if not millions — of end users.
 
How can we avert this? The idea behind "reproducible" builds is to allow verification that no flaws have been introduced during build processes; this prevents against the installation of backdoor-introducing malware on developers' machines, ensuring attempts at extortion and other forms of subterfuge are quickly uncovered and thus ultimately futile.

Through a story of three different developers, this talk will engage you on this growing threat to you and how it affects everyone involved in the production lifecycle of software development, as well as how reproducible builds can help prevent against it. 
 

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12:00

╲╱
12:20
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13:05
Talk
Moon Lounge
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The new HTTP/2 protocol and the corresponding TLS/SSL are common to Traffic Server, HTTP Server and Tomcat. The presentation will shortly explain the new protocol and the ALPN extensions and look to the state of the those in our 3 servers and show the common parts and the specifics of each servers. A demo configuration of each server will be run.

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This presentation will focus on my real-world experiences transitioning from a smaller CloudStack IaaS provider with light workloads to a more sophisticated configuration required to run enterprise workloads.
We will cover specific differences in running KVM-based CloudStack on shared storage. In particular, we will focus on discussing light workloads vs. those having more serious CPU and IO demands and how to solve different stability, performance and usability challenges by leveraging Managed Storage in CloudStack. We will delve into the critical topics of implementing proper storage QoS and volume snapshots with Managed Storage. Finally, we will cover migrating VMs from traditional shared storage to Managed Storage with no downtime and discuss specific challenges here and how they can be addressed.
Presentation is intended for CloudStack system administrators and technical people operating CloudStack on daily basis.

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12:40
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13:00
Asynchronous Collaboration

The Hateful 20

Lars Francke
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
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I’ll spent a good chunk of these 20 minutes listing a bunch of pet peeves (like the value of documentation contributions or how hard it is to even get started contributing) I have acquired while participating in various FOSS projects (mostly ASF). It might involve some ranting - to be precise there will almost certainly be ranting. And I’m afraid there'll be very little in the way of offering solutions. That’s why I’d love to start a discussion in the hope that others have more ideas than I do.

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12:40
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13:00
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
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The FOSSASIA labyrinth is a game for kids to change to their liking: new rooms, music, features. The architecture and process allow steady contribution to the game with gradually increasing difficulty.

How can we make open-source projects a place for learning and continuous growth? How can we bring young people into open-source? These are questions I would like to answer. Over the past three years of Google Code-In, I maintained two games with increasing contributions by students. I would like to share the experience I have gained and end with a discussion about how to open up the contributing process for younger people and newcomers and how to keep them engaged.

Labyrinth: https://github.com/fossasia/labyrinth

Google Code-In with FOSSASIA: https://gci17.fossasia.org/

Learnings: http://niccokunzmann.github.io/blog/2018-01-18/designing-living-architectures

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14:00

╲╱
14:00
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14:20
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
╲╱

Apache Flink is a project with a very active, supportive, and continuously growing community. Last year, Flink was among the top ten projects of the Apache Software Foundation with the most traffic on user and development mailing lists. Looking back, Flink started as a research prototype developed by three PhD students at TU Berlin in 2009. In 2014, the developers donated the code base to the ASF and joined the newly founded Apache Flink incubator project. Within three years, Flink grew into a healthy project and gained a lot of momentum.

In my presentation, I will discuss Flink's journey from an academic research project to one of the most active projects of the Apache Software Foundation. I will talk about the academic roots of the project, how the original developers got introduced to the ASF, Flink's incubation phase, and how its community evolved after it graduated and became an ASF top-level project. My talk will focus on the decisions, efforts, and circumstances that helped to grow a vital and welcoming open source community.

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14:00
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14:20
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
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Tim works for a small company. When he comes home from work in the evening he likes to code for an open source project. This project is not just any project, but part of a product used by thousands of users in professional environments like public sector companies.

Can you imagine the commit made by Tim from his family home ending up there? Yes of course! But for it to happen, some things do need to be done. Before being included in final releases and rolled out to customers, Tim's changes need to go through defined QA procedures.

In this talk, Michael Kromer from Kopano shows how communities and products work together and how Tim's commit makes it into the final release of a product: Kopano, used by thousands of users in large organizations as a replacement of Microsoft Exchange or Office365

This talk is presented by Kopano.

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14:20
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15:05
Talk
Moon Lounge
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Although mostly known as a fast and reliable web server, Apache httpd also excels as a reverse proxy. In this session find out how to setup httpd as a reverse proxy, how to connect to Tomcat using HTTP and AJP, and the full feature list of Apache httpd proxying capability.

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14:20
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15:05
Talk
Palais Atelier
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Kubernetes slowly become one of the most popular container runtime environment while Hadoop has already been widely used open source bigdata  platform since a long time. The questions is here: how can we use the new cloud-native toolset to administer and manage Hadoop based clusters? Is there any benefit to run Hadoop and other bigdata application on top of Kubernetes?

In this presentation I will show that Hadoop is not a legacy application but it could be run very easy in cloud-native environment thanks to the generic and distributed by design.

The first step to run an application in a Kuberrnetes cluster is containerization. Creating containers for an application is easy (even if it’s a goold old distributed application like Apache Hadoop), just a few steps of packaging. The hard part isn't packaging: it's deploying

How can we run the containers together? How to configure them? How do the services in the containers find and talk to each other? How do you deploy and manage clusters with hundred of nodes?

Modern cloud native tools like Kubernetes or Consul/Nomad could help a lot but they could be used in different way.

It this presentation I will demonstrate multiple solutions to manage containerized clusters with different cloud-native tools including kubernetes, and docker-swarm/compose.

No matter which tools you use, the same questions of service discovery and configuration management arise. This talk will show the key elements needed to make that containerized cluster work.

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14:30
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15:10
Talk Intermediate
Kesselhaus
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Working on an open source project is certainly not easy, especially when it starts to be big. Past the excitement of the beginning, how do we make it going on in the long run ?

What about a project that grows bigger and bigger, up to a point we are facing hundred of thousands of single lines of code ? What about testing it across multiple platforms ? What about the toolings that are needed – debugging, data migration, etc – ? What about the documentation ?

This talk is about the few simple rules that make it easier, and successful. It also exposes a few traps that are not so easy to avoid, and how to keep people involved in the long run.

More critical, it will explain how to conduct the project so that it’s still relevant after 10 years, in a moving industry.

╱╲
14:30
-
15:10
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
╲╱

Are you managing an open source project? How much does this matter to your reputation, business, or bottom line? This session will provide practical takeaways to help you reach the right audience and open up productive lines of communication with your project’s users and community members. This session is suitable for beginners to marketing.

From predictable release schedules and release notes; to the differences between tutorials, guides, and documentation; and yes, to your promotional schedule–marketing touches on all aspects of communication between your users and your product. This is Marketing through the lens of technical communication. We’ll look at marketing from an open source perspective and consider how you can apply well established techniques to help your project and community thrive.

Users don’t want to see their feature requests or bug reports sink into a black hole; they expect transparent communications; and they expect to be able to contribute improvements directly. What are popular open source projects doing right (and wrong) now and why? No matter the size, whether you have a new module, a theme, an integration, or a full distribution; you can probably find ways to improve your technical and marketing communications.

We often think of marketing as hyperbole or BS, but if you are authentic and accurate in your promotional communications, you can even market to developers :-) You’ll leave this session with a practical checklist of how you can improve the marketing and communication of your open source project to increase adoption and grow your user community.

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14:40
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16:00
Workshop Intermediate
Palais Workshop
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Which features should your application have? One way is asking what features users want. But doing this, one learns nothing about why users want that feature. This easily leads to unintegrated functionality, incoherent purpose of your application and more code to maintain. 

An alternative to asking what users want is to find out how they work, what they know and what motivated them to focus not on features but on needs. 

This workshop introduces a method for researching and documenting workflows together with users. It is a method which makes the data recording transparent and participatory and leads to relatively easy data analysis and communication. 

With the knowledge, decisions can be taken based on sharable data and merits.

Read about the method at: https://fordes.de/posts/participatoryDesign-workflow-co-documentation.html 

The created material, the analysis and resulting reports can be seen at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:WikidataCon_2017_-_Share_and_document_workflows_to_improve_Wikidata%27s_use_experience

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15:00

╲╱
15:15
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16:00
Talk
Moon Lounge
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One of the most important application characteristics nowadays are scalability and resilience. To achieve this, applications can use non-blocking, event-driven manner that scale with a small number of threads and backpressure. In Spring Framework 5, a new reactive stack is introduced, which includes Servlet/Reactive Streams bridge. Using this new capability it is possible to create reactive applications that can be deployed on Apache Tomcat.

In this session the attendees will learn how to leverage this bridge in their applications deployed on Apache Tomcat. The presenter will share internal details about how the bridge is implemented supporting both HTTP and Websocket protocols. Also a performance comparison will be presented showing the benefits of the new approach.

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15:15
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16:00
Talk
Palais Atelier
╲╱

Processing Big Data and managing large-scale container deployments both necessitates large compute cluster. And large clusters -especially when running multiple Big Data systems- require some kind of cluster manager and cluster scheduler.

In this talk, we will give an overview how Apache Mesos help solves the problems of large-scale clusters and then take a look at the current state of the Container Orchestration and Big Data ecosystem built on top of this foundation.

For example, Mesos enables users to easily deploy and manage container using different frameworks (e.g., kubernetes, marathon, or Apache Aurora).

Furthermore, we will look at the growing Big Data ecosystem on top of Apache Mesos and DC/OS including, for example, Apache Spark, Apache Cassandra, and Apache Kafka.

Finally, we will also provide some insights into future developments, both for the foundation (i.e., Apache Mesos) as well as the ecosystem on top.

╱╲
15:20
-
16:00
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
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The first external person contributing to our project is amazing, but when that 1 snowballs to 1,000 life can get a little bit stressful. All of these fine lovely people want to help, but somehow no one seems to want to deal with code reviews, proposed documentation changes, or keeping your testing infrastructure alive, or maybe they just want to pull in different directions.

This talk explores what happens as a community grows and provides recommendations to organize your community. We’ll focus on how to control the fun chaos and how to build a development path that keeps your comitters engaged and your community growing. All of these are based on the speakers’ experiences in their own personal projects (which have much less than 1k contributors) as well as larger projects, like Apache Spark.


Come for the being told it’s not your fault, stay for the techniques to avoid pissing everyone off.

P.S.

If one of the speakers is behind on reviewing one of your pull requests she is sorry and would like to offer you a sticker and hope this talk explains some of why she is late.

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15:20
-
16:00
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
╲╱

Most developers (any developers) have little to no exposure to the world of marketing.  In Open Source project, developers are doing this for fun and on their own time- which usually means they want to write code and make cool new features.  But why are you building this cool amazing software, if no one is going to use it? Marketing can be tedious but it really is essential for both increasing user adoption of a project and recruiting new devs to help work on the project.

The Big Data Apache projects of the late 2000s-early 2010s (e.g. Hadoop and Spark) were wildly popular- however they both solved a very painful business problem AND had professional marketing departments behind them.  For most smaller projects, this falls back on developers and other community members.  

In this talk we’ll discuss, the “path users/developers take to find your project”, the open source “purchase funnel” (getting someone to become aware, interested in, trying out, and becoming a contributor to your project), tactical considerations such as SEO, Google Adwords, Twitter campaigns, overall cohesive messaging, and more- all through a case study around Apache Mahout which after becoming extremely popular in the early 2010’s, fell out of popularity (a victim of professional marketing from other projects, among other things), refactored, and now has a unique problem of being a well known name in Big Data, but known for something it no longer does (run on Hadoop).

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╱╲

16:00

╲╱
16:30
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17:10
Talk Intermediate
Kesselhaus
╲╱

Technology communities in general and open source projects in particular frequently suffer from a lack of diversity, with low participation rates by women, people of color, and other marginalized populations who are frequently targets of harassment and abuse.

This session will talk about the tools and techniques and approaches used by various open source communities to help support and maintain friendly environments for large and diverse groups of contributors from around the world.

We'll discuss how these communities manage conflicts and the various challenges they've faced while working to help keep their projects welcoming and inclusive places that support positive participation by all.

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16:30
-
17:10
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
╲╱

Apache, that's just the webserver right? No? Oh, what about Apache Hadoop, Apache Lucene, Apache Flink, Apache Mesos. Oh yes! But what's the Apache thing all about, and why does it matter?

The "Apache Way" is the process by which Apache Software Foundation projects are managed. It has evolved over many years and has produced over 100 highly successful open source projects. But what is it and how does it work?

In this session we'll discover how an Apache project is (and isn't!) managed. We will see how the foundation provides an technical and legal infrastructure for each project, and how the Apache Way provides the governance scaffolding for individual projects. This provides the framework for Apache projects which are then free to apply the Apache Way to ensure their project succeeds.

Having attended this session you will have a better understanding of the inner workings of both the foundation and its projects. With this understanding you will be better equipped to engage with and benefit from Apache projects.

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16:35
-
17:20
Talk
Moon Lounge
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Bringing a webapp into production is one thing, but ensuring it runs 24/7 is its own science.
MoSKito (http://www.moskito.org) is an open source application performance management tool, which provides you detailed information about application's behavior, thread, cpu and memory usage, execution time of every method in your class, errors in your application and many more.
The talk give a brief 5 minute introduction into MoSKito's tools and concepts, rest of the time is used for a live demonstration on a living web-application with real glitches. Usage of apache tomcat and tomcat specific information usage in MoSKito are in focus of the talk.

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16:35
-
17:20
Talk
Palais Atelier
╲╱

Serverless technology is a way of deploying individual functions to the cloud and running them on demand.  This makes them very easy to work with, isolated from one another, and also individually scalable.  Come and learn how begin using Apache Openwhisk for your own applications such as APIs or chatbot integrations.  This session is recommended for tech leads and developers of all levels.

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╱╲

17:00

╲╱
17:20
-
18:00
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
╲╱

Communicating in written form is hard anyway, and our Open Source circles add the additional hurdle of different cultural backgrounds and sensitivities.

Irony doesn't work. Jokes don't work. People get offended for no reason. They don't get what you're saying. Or they get it all wrong. Misunderstandings and conflicts are just around the corner, although we think we do our best to be efficient, fun and entertaining when talking to our project communities.

The problem is that our cultural backgrounds get in the way and shape the way we perceive many of the subtle nuances of human communication. Puzzled (or horrified) faces can help steer face-to-face conversations the right way, but we don't have this luxury in the asynchronous written communications which are the norm in Open Development.

Based on 17 years of experience in many projects of the Apache Software Foundation, our concrete examples of fun anecdotes, unnerving communication mishaps and nuclear-level conflicts (almost) will help us avoid common pitfalls and have happier and more efficient conversations in multi-cultural environments.

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17:20
-
18:00
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
╲╱

A natural progression for many corporate projects is towards open governance, in addition to open source. Of the open governance foundations, the Apache Software Foundation is well established and widely known. In October 2016, the open governance process began for NetBeans IDE, moving from Oracle to Apache. In this session, the speaker, who has been involved in the Apache NetBeans donation process from the beginning, will share tips and insights and give you everything you need to understand everything entailed to moving large corporate projects to Apache. After this session, you'll know exactly how to get started and be informed about the potential pitfalls, as well as the joys, of moving internal corporate projects into open governance development settings!

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17:30
-
18:15
Talk
Moon Lounge
╲╱

Some of the hardest to tackle production problems are performance problems. A very important but still widely unknown feature of the Java Virtual Machine is the ability to provide thread dumps. They show exactly where the application code currrently is executing. In case of performance problems, specific code areas typically show up prominently in thread dumps. Examples are waiting for remote services like databases or REST calls, waiting for local locking operations or waiting for exhausted pooled resources like connection pools.

A big strength of thread dump is, that they are production safe and typically do not need any preparation before one can use them.

To make efficient use if thread dumps, one needs to gain some experience in interpreting them and efficiently extracting the most important information.

The speaker uses thread dumps for performance analysis a lot. The talk will give lots of real life examples.

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17:30
-
18:15
Talk
Palais Atelier
╲╱

High availability of data across geographic regions for search and analytical applications is a challenging task. Mission critical applications need effective failover strategies across data centers. Apache Solr offers Cross Data Center Replication (CDCR) as a feature from 6.0 and has added more features in subsequent releases. The first part of session will center on an active-passive design model with one data-center as the primary and other data-centers as secondary clusters. The second design model centers on designing an active-active bidirectional setup such that both querying and indexing traffic can gracefully be redirected to the failover cluster. The third part of session will center on an actual use case: An analytics application with high availability. We will discuss the improvements observed in terms of maintenance, performance, and throughput. The session concludes with challenges and/or limitations in the current design and what improvements are forthcoming for Cross Data Center Replication in Apache Solr.

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18:00

╲╱
18:10
-
18:30
Asynchronous Collaboration

Strategies for Better UX

Ame Elliott
Talk Beginner
Kesselhaus
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A system may have technical features, but if the user experience (UX) is confusing, people will not be able to use them. UX is more than icons and colors, and UX skills in information architecture and writing are particularly important for expanding the reach of FOSS projects to a wider audience. This talk provides practical starting points for open source teams interested in improving their UX, including strategies to incorporate user research and feedback.

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18:10
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18:30
Talk Beginner
Maschinenhaus
╲╱

The OpenStack community prides itself on its "Four Opens": open source, open design, open development and open community. Each of the four opens has an impact on the choices made by the community and helps to shape the guiding principles and the shared culture of the community as well as its technical governance model.

In this short talk, I will present how the OpenStack community implemented its four opens; I will detail the implications in terms of governance, infrastructure, development processes and communication tools, and how similar approaches could be easily used by other communities.

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